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Mayor Pete Buttigieg: ‘Think of Something Really Gay — That’s How Gay I Am’

Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual & Transgender

Mayor Pete Buttigieg: ‘Think of Something Really Gay — That’s How Gay I Am’

Postby smix » Sat Apr 20, 2019 8:11 pm

Mayor Pete Buttigieg: ‘Think of Something Really Gay — That’s How Gay I Am’
Breitbart News

URL: https://www.breitbart.com/politics/2019 ... -gay-i-am/
Category: Politics
Published: April 19, 2019

Description: Mayor Pete Buttigieg acknowledged that he would face challenges as an openly gay presidential candidate if he ultimately faced President Donald Trump in the general election.

pete-to-pete.jpg

“I’m from Indiana, I’m gay as a — I don’t know, think of something really gay — that’s how gay I am,” he said in an interview with TMZ’s Harvey Levin. Levin warned Buttigieg that Trump campaign would most certainly turn homophobic. “I’m used to bullying,” Buttigieg replied. “I think you confront it, initially, and move on.” He said that as a presidential candidate he would focus on calling out Trump’s behavior but remain intent on changing the subject to his own agenda. Buttigieg quoted Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. saying that “darkness cannot drive out darkness. Only light can do that.” Levin, who is also gay, asked Buttigieg if he was worried that his homosexuality would be a “dealbreaker” for many Americans. “You know, there are some people that I’m never going to get, and that just is what it is, that’s how it always is in some way shape or form in politics,” he replied. Buttigieg said that he was encouraged after Indiana citizens rose up to condemn the religious freedom law signed by then-governor Mike Pence. “I don’t care how conservative you are, how religious you are, if you realize that someone is coming to harm because of something you believe, something you used to believe was right, it’s going to open up your heart at least a little bit to change,” he said. He said that it was important to “call” Americans to the “right side of history” and encourage them towards more progressive policies, rather than be accusatory or demanding about what they should think or say. Buttigieg said that Americans became more tolerant of gay lifestyles as they grew to know them personally. He said that he considered himself pretty physically fit, but admitted that he was tempted a lot by unhealthy campaign food on the trail. He acknowledged that his Instagram was full of unhealthy food. “The things that you can deep fry…” he said, pointing to food found at local fairs. Buttigieg told TMZ he was not worried by his husband Chasten’s prolific use of social media despite his presidential run. He admitted that sometimes they drafted angry tweets together to get it off their chests, but would never send them. “He’s pretty good at running stuff by me, and I’ll run stuff by him for a gut check too,” he said.



MAD Magazine Mocks Pete Buttigieg for Failing to Recognize Alfred E. Neuman
Breitbart News

URL: https://www.breitbart.com/politics/2019 ... es-to-war/
Category: Politics
Published: May 12, 2019

Description: MAD magazine has declared war on Democratic presidential candidate Pete Buttigieg after he slighted the humorous publication on Friday, saying he did not recognize the iconic “Alfred E. Neuman” character and that he had to look it up on Google.

Alfred-E-Neuman.jpg

President Donald Trump compared Buttigieg to Alfred E. Neuman in an interview with Politico published Friday, saying: “Alfred E. Neuman cannot become president of the United States.” When asked to respond to the insult, Buttigieg replied: “I’ll be honest. I had to Google that. I guess it’s just a generational thing. I didn’t get the reference.” In response, MAD — which has hardly shied away from mocking Trump — took on Buttigieg directly, tweeting:
Who’s Pete Buttigieg? Must be a generational thing.
— MAD Magazine (@MADmagazine) May 11, 2019

In addition, the magazine retweeted a critic of Buttigieg (and Trump):
I’m 37, I grew up reading Mad Magazine and buying it (cheap!) At the newsstands. It’s not a generational thing, Mayor Pete just somehow missed a major cultural landmark of the last 50 years. And Trump is an idiot.
— Zach D Roberts (@zdroberts) May 11, 2019

The magazine also changed its Twitter profile, describing itself as: “Historic comedy institution with Mayor Pete on the cover.” Buttigieg, the mayor of South Bend, Indiana, has found traction in Silicon Valley, where Alfred E. Neuman is likely quite familiar among the tech community as a comic brand. Politico noted that then-candidate Sen. Barack Obama (D-IL) referred to Alfred E. Neuman in poking fun at his own appearance in a speech at the Alfred E. Smith Memorial Foundation Dinner in New York during the 2008 presidential election: “There is no other crowd in America that I’d rather be palling around with right now,” he said. “It is often said that I share the politics of Alfred E. Smith and the ears of Alfred E. Neuman.”

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By insulting MAD to target Trump, Buttigieg risks a fight with a popular satirical publication — never a place an aspiring candidate in a crowded field of competitors wants to be. Trump tends to use nicknames and insults to ridicule his opponents — often experimenting with different versions before settling on one for each adversary. For example, he began referring to former Vice President Joe Biden as “Sleepy Joe,” though he modified that last week to “SleepyCreepy Joe” in a tweet about Biden’s high poll numbers.
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Buttigieg explains rise of socialism: 'Capitalism has let a lot of people down'

Postby smix » Sat Apr 20, 2019 9:00 pm

Buttigieg explains rise of socialism: 'Capitalism has let a lot of people down'
The Hill

URL: https://thehill.com/homenews/campaign/4 ... -of-people
Category: Politics
Published: April 16, 2019

Description: Democratic presidential candidate Pete Buttigieg said Tuesday that he believes socialism is gaining popularity because "capitalism has let a lot of people down." "I think the reason we're having this argument over socialism and capitalism is that capitalism has let a lot of people down," the mayor of South Bend, Ind., said on CNN's "New Day." He also said that he believes in "democratic capitalism" and reiterated his comments that democracy is more important than capitalism. "At the end of the day, we prioritize democracy," he said. "And having that framework of a rule of law, of fairness, is actually what it takes for markets to work." Buttigieg told CNN that he is "open to" embracing a proposal by Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.), who is also running for president, to put a new tax on large companies. "I'm open to that," he said. "I think the more interesting issue is, should our policies be any different toward the biggest companies than they are toward the smallest ones?" When he was questioned on whether he would break up large corporations, he said "sometimes, if there's anti-competitive behavior. "It's not just about saying, 'If you're this big, we're going to break you.' It's also, perhaps, the bigger you are, the more responsibility you have," he added. Buttigieg, who officially joined the race at a Sunday campaign launch, is among more than a dozen candidates competing for the Democratic Party's 2020 presidential nomination and being questioned about socialism. Once seen as a long-shot candidate, Buttigieg in recent weeks has received significant media attention and a bump in the polls. His rival, Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.), is a self-described democratic socialist.



'Mayor Pete, the centrist rockstar' is only a liberal fantasy
The Hill

URL: https://thehill.com/opinion/campaign/43 ... al-fantasy
Category: Politics
Published: April 12, 2019

Description: Pete Buttigieg, the youthful, charismatic mayor of South Bend, Ind., is not the centrist rockstar that mainstream media are trying to portray him to be. On the contrary, Buttigieg actually is a socialist hypocrite. On paper, Buttigieg has a quirky jumble of virtues that are designed to appeal, however paradoxically, to all of 2019 America’s deeply divided sectors. He’s a committed and unapologetic liberal, who nevertheless slams “social justice warriors.” He’s openly gay and married to a man, but a practicing Christian who quotes Scripture as readily as he does G.K. Chesterton. He’s a white man who sticks to his small town, Midwestern roots, but also a Rhodes Scholar and Harvard-educated cosmopolitan who speaks eight languages. He’s a peacenik whose Harvard thesis endorsed Catholic novelist Graham Greene’s critique of American interventionism, but he also volunteered to go to Afghanistan as a military intelligence officer. In reality, “Mayor Pete” is just executing a well-crafted pantomime of the ultimate representation of a common ground that doesn’t actually exist in America. Buttigieg’s centrism and moderation, to put it bluntly, is an act only liberals could think stands up to even the most cursory investigation. As his presidential “exploration” turns to a near-certain campaign, Buttigieg has been forced to give form to his nebulous appeal. Therein lies his problem. As we’re quickly seeing, he offers nothing different than the typical coastal liberals and neosocialist progressives he’s competing against for the Democratic nomination. Take Buttigieg’s appeals to Christian conservatives, for example. As soon as he’s put under even the friendliest of microscopes, such as in puff interviews with CNN and NBC, the wheels start to come off. To the extent that he’s prepared to bring religion into the political mix, he vigorously supports the same anti-Christian policy agenda that has been promoted for years by the furthest fringes of the atheist left. Late-term abortion to the point of birth, restrictions on pro-life speech, government recognition of gay marriage as equivalent to the biblically prescribed union of a man and woman — all of it is consistent with Buttigieg’s version of Christianity. Needless to say, so is the liberal wish list on a whole host of other issues. On “Meet the Press,” Buttigieg said that Christ’s dictates about caring for the “least of these my brethren” and the “stranger” means America must do more for immigrants. Notably, Buttigieg took to Twitter recently to spread nonsense that has been soundly disproven about President Trump calling immigrants “animals”; in fact, Trump was referring to MS-13 gang members who have been inflicting brutal violence on American communities. Buttigieg even had the nerve to call evangelical Christians “hypocrites” for supporting Trump. Buttigieg went so far as to question Trump’s belief in God, chiding Christians for supporting someone who seems to lack the sort of humility that Jesus held up as a spiritual ideal, all while boldly claiming that his own unapologetic same-sex marriage puts him on the “right side of history.” In a race that is shaping up to be a referendum on socialism in America, liberals have somehow convinced themselves that Buttigieg represents a nonexistent middle ground between an economic system based on freedom and one based on coercion. The media are playing along with Mayor Pete’s attempt to thread the needle between unrepentant socialists such as Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) and President Trump’s determination that “America will never be a socialist country.” This fantasy doesn’t survive even the most basic inspection. One of the oft-cited entries on Buttigieg’s long list of progressive credentials is winning the JFK Presidential Library’s 2000 “Profile in Courage” essay contest as a teenager. One wonders if the reporters fueling Buttigieg’s growing celebrity actually have read his essay, which cites Bernie Sanders as Buttigieg’s political hero and praises the then-Vermont congressman’s “courage” for adopting the socialist mantle. It should come as no surprise, then, that even as he now tries to position himself as a “capitalist” presidential candidate, Buttigieg still sees capitalism as being “in tension” with democracy. Anyone expecting Pete Buttigieg to be the Democratic Party’s centrist savior in a deeply divided presidential race ought to consider that last remark carefully, because it’s a perfect example of the sort of pandering that alienates voters on both ends of the political spectrum. Buttigieg is no centrist. He’s just another opportunistic politician who thinks he can avoid tackling the real issues by telling everybody what they want to hear. He’s only a rockstar in the imaginations of the mainstream media who are failing to vet him as he masquerades as a credible candidate for president.



Buttigieg campaign says it will stop using 'Pharisees' to describe conservative Christians
The Hill

URL: https://thehill.com/homenews/campaign/4 ... o-describe
Category: Politics
Published: April 17, 2019

Description: A spokesperson for South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete Buttigieg’s (D) presidential campaign said Tuesday that the candidate will no longer use the term “Pharisee” to describe what he perceives as religious hypocrisy. Buttigieg has repeatedly used the term in reference to Vice President Pence to accuse Pence of hypocrisy for serving in President Trump’s administration while espousing conservative Christian values.

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Progressive Jewish leaders have argued the use of the term as an insult has anti-Semitic undertones. Rabbi Danya Ruttenberg referred back to an earlier tweet in which she said use of the term as an insult by non-Jewish people “has been used to murder & expel us for centuries--Inquisitions, pogroms, expulsions, the Holocaust, you name it.”
If someone on @PeteButtigieg's campaign cares about the fact that his repeated use of "Pharisee" is harmful to Jews and would be open to learning about why and how to do better, y'all are welcome to reach out to me. I can kasher pots and talk about antisemitism at the same time.
— Rabbi Danya Ruttenberg (@TheRaDR) April 16, 2019

In response, Buttigieg spokesperson Lis Smith tweeted “We appreciate the people who have reached out to educate us on this. While intended to highlight political hypocrisy, we listened and learned and won’t be using it going forward.”
We appreciate the people who have reached out to educate us on this. While intended to highlight political hypocrisy, we listened and learned and won’t be using it going forward.
— Lis Smith (@Lis_Smith) April 16, 2019

Pharisees were a Jewish sect that existed in the first century, and are depicted in the New Testament as frequently in conflict with Jesus. “When you see someone, especially somebody who has such a dogmatic take on faith that they bring it into public life, being willing to attach themselves to this administration for the purposes of gaining power, it is alarmingly resonant with some New Testament themes, and not in a good way,” Buttigieg told The Washington Post in reference to Pence. The controversy, and Buttigieg’s pledge, echo an earlier story in which the 37-year-old used the phrase “all lives matter” in a speech. Buttigieg said he was not aware of controversy over the phrase, which racial justice advocates have claimed deliberately minimize the hardships faced specifically by black Americans.



Barney Frank: Buttigieg wouldn't be getting the same attention 'if he were straight'
The Hill

URL: https://thehill.com/homenews/campaign/4 ... be-getting
Category: Politics
Published: April 18, 2019

Description: Former Rep. Barney Frank (D-Mass.) says he doesn't think Democratic presidential candidate Pete Buttigieg would have had the same meteoric rise in the polls he's seen "if he was straight." “If he were straight, I don’t think he’d be getting the attention that he’s getting,” Frank told host Chris Matthews on MSNBC's "Hardball" on Wednesday. But Frank added, that when Buttigieg "gets the attention, he is so talented and good at this and solid that he makes the most of it.” Both Buttigieg and Frank are openly gay. Matthews contrasted the reception Buttigieg, the mayor of South Bend, Ind., received with Frank's own experiences in Congress. He recalled that when Frank came out to then-House Speaker Thomas “Tip” O’Neill (D-Mass.), O’Neill responded that he was “sorry to hear it,” saying Frank could otherwise have been Speaker some day. Frank called Buttigieg's progress “both a sign that the prejudice is diminishing and it is an opportunity further to diminish the prejudice by giving him this platform.” Buttigieg during a speech in Iowa this week was interrupted by far-right activist Randall Terry, who shouted “remember Sodom and Gomorrah.” The next day at another event, Buttigieg was greeted by protesters dressed as him, Satan and Jesus. “People don’t get heckled if nobody thinks they’re a threat,” Frank told Matthews about the protesters. “The fact that these bigoted lunatics start acting out in public, it’s a sign of their desperation.” Buttigieg has overcome initial low name recognition and a crowded Democratic field to surge to the upper tier of Democratic candidates in recent weeks. Multiple polls have shown the 37-year-old mayor in third place behind former Vice President Joe Biden and Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.). A national poll indicates that if the former vice president, who has not yet officially announced a bid, declines to run, Buttigieg would be the second choice for 17 percent of Biden supporters.



Buttigieg: 'Frankly, I came out because I wanted to date'
The Hill

URL: https://thehill.com/homenews/campaign/4 ... ed-to-date
Category: Lifestyle
Published: April 23, 2019

Description: South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete Buttigieg said on Monday that he came out because he wanted to date, and that doing so meant he eventually met his current husband. "Frankly, I came out because I wanted to date," Buttigieg said at a CNN town hall when asked by host Anderson Cooper about whether he would have been different had he come out publicly at a younger age. "If dating had been available to me in my 20s I'm not sure I would have gotten that much done," Buttigieg then joked. Buttigieg has said he came out publicly at 33. But turning more serious, the 2020 presidential candidate said his decision to date more meant he eventually found husband, Chasten Buttigieg. “I don't know how I would do this without him," he said about the 2020 campaign for president. Pete Buttigieg has talked openly about being gay in his campaign, discussing his decision to come out and what it has meant in his life and revealing that he met his husband on the app Hinge. Chasten Buttigieg has also become a key part of the campaign, becoming a celebrity in his own right.



Franklin Graham rails against Buttigieg for calling himself 'gay Christian'
The Hill

URL: https://thehill.com/homenews/campaign/4 ... -christian
Category: Religion
Published: April 24, 2019

Description: Evangelist Franklin Graham, an outspoken supporter of President Trump, on Wednesday slammed 2020 presidential candidate Pete Buttigieg for calling himself a "gay christian," saying that the Bible defines homosexuality as something to be repentant of. "Buttigieg is right—God doesn’t have a political party," Graham tweeted. "But God does have commandments, laws & standards He gives us to live by. God doesn’t change. His Word is the same yesterday, today & forever." Graham, the son of legendary preacher Billy Graham, added in a separate tweet that "as a Christian I believe the Bible which defines homosexuality as sin, something to be repentant of, not something to be flaunted, praised or politicized." "The Bible says marriage is between a man & a woman—not two men, not two women," Graham said, before saying in a final tweet that "the core of the Christian faith is believing and following Jesus Christ, who God sent to be the Savior of the world—to save us from sin, to save us from hell, to save us from eternal damnation.
Presidential candidate & South Bend Mayor @PeteButtigieg is right—God doesn’t have a political party. But God does have commandments, laws & standards He gives us to live by. God doesn’t change. His Word is the same yesterday, today & forever. 1/3
— Franklin Graham (@Franklin_Graham) April 24, 2019

Mayor Buttigieg says he’s a gay Christian. As a Christian I believe the Bible which defines homosexuality as sin, something to be repentant of, not something to be flaunted, praised or politicized. The Bible says marriage is between a man & a woman—not two men, not two women. 2/3
— Franklin Graham (@Franklin_Graham) April 24, 2019

The core of the Christian faith is believing and following Jesus Christ, who God sent to be the Savior of the world—to save us from sin, to save us from hell, to save us from eternal damnation. 3/3
— Franklin Graham (@Franklin_Graham) April 24, 2019

Buttigieg's campaign did not immediately respond to a request for comment from The Hill. The comments from Graham came days after Buttigieg stated that "God doesn't have a political party" while talking about the ways he would unite liberal and conservative people of faith in his 2020 campaign. Buttigieg, who is openly gay, has been extremely open about faith since launching an exploratory committee for president earlier this year. The 37-year-old has taken aim at the Trump administration, and has repeatedly criticized Vice President Pence over his religious beliefs. “The vice president is entitled to his religious beliefs," Buttigieg said on CNN last week."My problem is when those religious beliefs are used as an excuse to harm other people." Buttigieg has also said that President Trump's actions make it hard to "believe that they're the actions of somebody who believes in God." Graham has been a vocal supporter of Trump throughout his presidency. He said in November that he endorses Trump because he defends the Christian faith. "Now people say 'Well Frank but how can you defend him, when he's lived such a sordid life?' " Graham said on "Axios on HBO." "I never said he was the best example of the Christian faith. He defends the faith. And I appreciate that very much."



Chasten Buttigieg emerges as Mayor Pete's secret weapon
The Hill

URL: https://thehill.com/homenews/campaign/4 ... ret-weapon
Category: Politics
Published: April 27, 2019

Description: Chasten Buttigieg has emerged as a star in the Democratic primary, becoming a key part of his husband Pete Buttigieg's campaign and helping the South Bend, Ind., mayor stand out in a crowded field. The 29-year-old school humanities and drama junior high teacher from Michigan not only functions as a much sought-after campaign spokesman and adviser, but he is also helping humanize the first gay major presidential candidate in a country that only legalized same-sex marriage four years ago. But as Pete Buttigieg, 37, becomes a major contender for the nomination, questions are emerging about whether the gay couple will have the same appeal in more conservative parts of the country as they do with Democratic primary voters. “The bigger question is: if he were to win the nomination how voters in key states who might not know any married gay couples and be uncomfortable with their relationship may react, and I think that remains to be seen,” Tim Miller, former communications director to Jeb Bush and GOP strategist. For now, as Pete Buttigieg, also widely known as Mayor Pete, has surged in the Democratic polls, so has the attention lavished on Chasten Buttigieg, who took a leave from the Montessori Academy to join him on the campaign trail. Though Pete Buttigieg is not the first gay candidate to seek a party’s presidential nomination — Fred Karger ran in the Republican primary in 2012 — he is widely seen as the first with a genuine shot at winning. And he has done so by making his biography as a gay Christian millennial, Rhodes Scholar and Afghanistan war veteran a key part of his campaign, including his love for Chasten Buttigieg. The couple speak openly about their relationship, including how they met through a dating app, their first date, and their marriage in 2018. They also own two dogs, Buddy and Truman, and Pete Buttigieg has talked about eventually having kids. Chasten Buttigieg now introduces his husband at some stops and also branches out on his own, including addressing the Human Rights Campaign in Houston and visiting the Ali Forney Center, a shelter for homeless LGBTQ young people, in New York. Pete Buttigieg’s husband has also seen his social media following surge, and now counts over 100,000 followers on Instagram and around 300,000 followers on Twitter — more than some of the 2020 candidates in the race like Reps. Tim Ryan (D-Ohio) or Eric Swalwell (D-Calif.). That visibility is unusual for a spouse or partner at such an early stage in the primary process, let alone a gay couple that remains one of the youngest in the Democratic field of over 20 candidates. “Its still very odd for me to see what the most normal looking couple, or the least fretful,” said Mark Rom, associate professor at Georgetown’s McCourt School of Public Policy, “is the gay couple in the race.” No other Democratic contenders has seen their partner or spouse have such a visible part of the campaign, though they have made brief cameos, including Sen. Elizabeth Warren’s (D-Mass.) husband in an Instagram video. Meanwhile, actress Rosario Dawson has talked about dating Sen. Cory Booker (D-N.J.). But strategists say that having Chasten Buttigieg play such a big role brings youth and authenticity to his husband's campaign, providing an advantage in a Democratic party where some are hungering for a fresh alternative to former Vice President Joe Biden and Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.), the two septuagenarians currently leading in the Democratic primary polls. “Chasten brings an authenticity to the campaign that is really valuable - particularly with his online presence,” Miller said. “He interacts like a normal millennial human online, not like a stilted or scripted pol and there's a lot of appeal to that. In some ways his persona reflects onto and humanizes Pete who is more straight-laced and political in his communications. Strategists also say that Chasten Buttigieg has an added advantage, helping Pete Buttigieg further stand out at a time when some Democratic primary voters are wary of nominating a traditional straight white male in a rapidly diversifying party. “It reminds Democratic primary voters that he is gay, which is a plus. It helps distinguish him from other white males in the race," said David Barker, a professor of government at American University, about how Chasten Buttigieg helps Pete Buttigieg's campaign. However, whether such openness will be accepted by more conservative — and older — parts of the country, should Pete Buttigieg clinch the nomination, remains in doubt, even as a number of LGBTQ lawmakers have been elected in recent years, including Sen. Kyrsten Sinema (D) from traditionally red state Arizona. Pete Buttigieg this month openly feuded with Vice President Pence, attacking the religious conservative for his stance on LGBTQ issues and gay marriage. "Being married to Chasten has made me a better human being because it has made me more compassionate, more understanding, more self-aware and more decent," he said at a widely-quoted speech at the LGBTQ Victory Fund's annual brunch, earlier this month. "My marriage to Chasten has made me a better man. And yes, Mr. Vice President, it has moved me closer to God," he added, prompting applause. Pence has opposed legalizing gay marriage, something he says stems from his Christian faith. Most recently Buttigieg was attacked by Franklin Graham, son of the late preacher Billy Graham. “Mayor Buttigieg says he’s a gay Christian. As a Christian I believe the Bible which defines homosexuality as sin, something to be repentant of, not something to be flaunted, praised or politicized. The Bible says marriage is between a man & a woman—not two men, not two women,” Graham tweeted on Wednesday. Still, some strategists dismiss the prospect that Pete Buttigieg, along with Chasten Buttigieg, might suffer because they are gay, noting that many conservatives opposed to same-sex marriage would probably not vote Democratic anyway. Instead, they encouraged the Buttigiegs to continue being open about their relationship. “Pete Buttigieg is a wunderkind, but at the core of it all is authenticity. His appeal is that he is young and smart, of course, but he is leading with his full self,” Democratic strategist Don Calloway, CEO of Pine Street strategies, said. “They are young, handsome and happy and in love, so their relationship is an asset to the campaign, much like it would be for a straight couple.”
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Re: Buttigieg explains rise of socialism: 'Capitalism has let a lot of people down'

Postby samurai » Sun Apr 21, 2019 12:46 am



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S O C I A L I S M

Think of Something Really Gay -

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That's How Socialist I Am

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Pete Buttigieg's father was a Marxist professor who lauded the Communist Manifesto

Postby smix » Sun Apr 21, 2019 1:24 am

Pete Buttigieg's father was a Marxist professor who lauded the Communist Manifesto
Washington Examiner

URL: https://www.washingtonexaminer.com/news ... -manifesto
Category: Politics
Published: April 2, 2019

Description: The father of Democratic presidential hopeful Pete Buttigieg was a Marxist professor who spoke fondly of the Communist Manifesto and dedicated a significant portion of his academic career to the work of Italian Communist Party founder Antonio Gramsci, an associate of Vladimir Lenin. Joseph Buttigieg, who died in January at the age of 71, immigrated to the U.S. in the 1970s from Malta and in 1980 joined the University of Notre Dame faculty, where he taught modern European literature and literary theory. He supported an updated version of Marxism that jettisoned some of Marx and Engel's more doctrinaire theories, though he was undoubtedly Marxist. He was an adviser to Rethinking Marxism, an academic journal that published articles “that seek to discuss, elaborate, and/or extend Marxian theory,” and a member of the editorial collective of Boundary 2, a journal of postmodern theory, literature, and culture. He spoke at many Rethinking Marxism conferences and other gatherings of prominent Marxists. In a 2000 paper for Rethinking Marxism critical of the approach of Human Rights Watch, Buttigieg, along with two other authors, refers to "the Marxist project to which we subscribe." In 1998, he wrote in an article for the Chronicle of Higher Education about an event in New York City celebrating the 150th anniversary of the Manifesto. He also participated in the event. "If The Communist Manifesto was meant to liberate the proletariat, the Manifesto itself in recent years needed liberating from Marxism's narrow post-Cold War orthodoxies and exclusive cadres. It has been freed," he wrote. "After a musical interlude, seven people read different portions of the Manifesto. Listening to it read, one could not help but be struck by the poignancy of its prose," he wrote. The readers "had implicitly warned even us faithful to guard against conferring upon it the status of Scripture, a repository of doctrinal verities." “Equity, environmental consciousness, and racial justice are surely some of the ingredients of a healthy Marxism. Indeed, Marxism's greatest appeal — undiminished by the collapse of Communist edifices — is the imbalances produced by other sociopolitical governing structures,” Buttigieg wrote. Paul Kengor, a professor at Grove City College and an expert in communism and progressivism, said Buttigieg was among a group of leftist professors who focused on injecting Marxism into the wider culture. "They’re part of a wider international community of Marxist theorists and academicians with a particular devotion to the writings of the late Italian Marxist theorist Antonio Gramsci, who died over 80 years ago. Gramsci was all about applying Marxist theory to culture and cultural institutions — what is often referred to as a 'long march through the institutions,' such as film, media, and especially education," Kengor told the Washington Examiner. Pete Buttigieg, an only child, shared a close relationship with his father. In his memoir Shortest Way Home, Pete called his dad a “man of the left, no easy thing on a campus like Notre Dame’s in the 1980s.” He wrote that while he did not understand his parents’ political discussions as a young child, “the more I heard these aging professors talk, the more I wanted to learn how to decrypt their sentences, and to grasp the political backstory of the grave concerns that commanded their attention and aroused such fist-pounding dinner debate.” Pete wrote that his dad was supportive when he came out as gay. He and his husband bought a house in South Bend around the corner from his parents, which gave the couple “a good support network despite our work and travel schedules” when they decided to get a dog. The elder Buttigieg was best known as one of the world’s leading scholars of Gramsci. Gramsci thought cultural change was critical to dismantling capitalism. Nevertheless, although critical of certain aspects of Bolshevism, Gramsci endorsed Vladimir Lenin’s “maximalist” politics and identified within the Leninist faction of the Italian communists. He went to Moscow in 1922 as the official representative of the Italian Communist Party and returned home to lead the resistance against Italy’s Prime Minister Benito Mussolini, on the orders of Lenin, while his new wife and children stayed in the USSR. Those efforts landed Gramsci in an Italian prison, where he lived much of his brief life, which ended in 1937 at the age of 46. Yet his time behind bars was also some of his most prolific, leading to a collection of essays called the Prison Notebooks. Buttigieg completed the authoritative English translation of Gramsci’s Prison Notebooks, and his articles on Gramsci have been translated into five languages. Buttigieg was a founding member and president of the International Gramsci Society, an organization that aims to “facilitate communication and the exchange of information among the very large number of individuals from all over the world who are interested in Antonio Gramsci's life and work and in the presence of his thought in contemporary culture.” In 2013, Buttigieg spoke at a $500,000 outdoor New York City art installation honoring Gramsci.
Joseph Buttigieg, presidente International Gramsci Society. #GramsciMonument

joseph-buttigieg-gramsci.jpg

— Manuela Cavalieri (@ManuelaCav) August 10, 2013

Buttigieg died just days after Mayor Pete announced his 2020 presidential exploratory committee. Lis Smith, communications adviser for Buttigieg’s presidential exploratory committee, declined to comment on how his father influenced his political beliefs or on Pete Buttigieg's thoughts on Marxist thinkers such as Gramsci. Pete Buttigieg said in an MSNBC interview on March 20 that he considers himself a capitalist but that the system needs changes. “The biggest problem with capitalism right now is the way it's become intertwined with power and is eroding our democracy,” Buttigieg said, noting the influence of big businesses in government. A self-described progressive, Buttigieg has called to abolish the Electoral College system, supports a pathway to citizenship for illegal immigrants in the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, and thinks that climate change is a national security threat. In another MSNBC interview in February, Buttigieg said that socialism “is a word in American politics that has basically lost all meaning” and “has been used as a kill switch to stop an idea from being talked about.” After his son won his mayoral election in 2011, Joseph Buttigieg told the Notre Dame student newspaper that he never expected him to run for office. “I know Peter has been interested in politics for a long time,” Buttigieg said. “At home we always discussed government affairs, but never in that way … I’m very pleased because he’s doing something he genuinely likes."



Buttigieg high school essay praised Sanders as courageous for calling himself 'Socialist'
Washington Examiner

URL: https://www.washingtonexaminer.com/poli ... -socialist
Category: Politics
Published: April 17, 2019

Description: Pete Buttigieg, in an award-winning high school essay he wrote in 2000, praised Bernie Sanders as courageous for describing himself as a "Socialist." The essay, which received the Profile in Courage Essay Contest award from the John F. Kennedy Presidential Museum and Library, criticized candidates who abandoned their ideals to appeal to a larger number of voters. The 37-year-old presidential candidate singled out Sanders as an example of political “courage.” “Sanders’ courage is evident in the first word he uses to describe himself: ‘Socialist,’" wrote Buttigieg. “In a country where Communism is still the dirtiest of ideological dirty words, in a climate where even liberalism is considered radical, and Socialism is immediately and perhaps willfully confused with Communism, a politician dares to call himself a socialist? He does indeed. "Here is someone who has ‘looked into his own soul’ and expressed an ideology, the endorsement of which, in today’s political atmosphere, is analogous to a self-inflicted gunshot wound,” added Buttigieg. “Even though he has lived through a time in which an admitted socialist could not act in a film, let alone hold a Congressional seat, Sanders is not afraid to be candid about his political persuasion.” The South Bend, Ind., mayor’s essay also suggests that Sanders, then an obscure, radical House member from Vermont, inspired his decision to enter politics. “I commend Bernie Sanders for giving me an answer to those who say American young people see politics as a cesspool of corruption, beyond redemption. I have heard that no sensible young person today would want to give his or her life to public service. I can personally assure you this is untrue,” he wrote. Buttigieg’s father, Joseph Buttigieg, who passed away in January, was a Marxist professor who praised the Communist Manifesto and was an adviser to the Rethinking Marxism academic journal, the Washington Examiner reported earlier this month. "If The Communist Manifesto was meant to liberate the proletariat, the Manifesto itself in recent years needed liberating from Marxism's narrow post-Cold War orthodoxies and exclusive cadres. It has been freed,” wrote Joseph Buttigieg in a 1998 article for the Chronicle of Higher Education. While Buttigieg has shied away from calling himself a socialist on the campaign trail, he has questioned the fairness of the capitalist system and called for reforms. Buttigieg, a virtual unknown before he entered the presidential race, has been moving steadily up in early polls. He came in third behind Joe Biden and Bernie Sanders in an Emerson survey this week, edging out better-known candidates such as Sens. Kamala Harris of California and Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts.
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Opinion: Pete Buttigieg's campaign slides toward socialism

Postby smix » Sun Apr 21, 2019 1:40 am

Opinion: Pete Buttigieg's campaign slides toward socialism
Indy Star

URL: https://www.indystar.com/story/opinion/ ... 882522002/
Category: Politics
Published: February 17, 2019

Description: Of all the values we prize as human beings, freedom should be the most important.
If you had any doubts about the embrace of socialism by the 2020 Democratic presidential field, they should be gone by now. One of Indiana’s own potential contenders — South Bend Mayor Pete Buttigieg — has jumped into the collectivist basket with both feet. Although acknowledging that America has a market-based economy and is “committed to democracy,” he told CNN’s Jake Tapper that a discussion about a policy can no longer be “killed off” by declaring that it’s socialism. He denounced President Trump’s damnation of socialism during his State of the Union address as an outmoded strategy of the Cold War era when “you saw a time in politics when the world socialism could be used to end an argument.” Today, he said, a word like socialism is the “beginning of a debate.” I’m not sure how Buttigieg squares “market-based economy” and “committed to democracy” with beginning a debate with the word socialism, but fine. Let the arguments begin. I’ll leave it to the economists to explain how command economies smother competition and thwart growth, condemning whole populations to an equality of misery. I’ll let the military experts detail the millions of people from Russia to China and Cambodia to Venezuela who have been sacrificed in the futile search for socialist utopia. I will hope the historians explain why the American Revolution was so much more sensible and, yes, moral than the French Revolution. I will defer to the clear-eyed empiricists to answer the chief arguments of the statist apologists who answer the complaint that “socialism has never worked” with “real socialism has never been tried” and “all socialist efforts have been thwarted by evil capitalist tyrants.” I will even forgo my usual cynical assessment that this country has socialized capitalism so much that the only real question up for debate is how much more socialist it will become, and how quickly. But I will make a small effort to express my strong objections to the philosophical underpinnings of socialism. Despite all the variations government experiments have explored over the centuries, there are really only two fundamental approaches. Government either celebrates the individual or it demands subservience to the group. There is freedom or there is no freedom. And that is it. Of all the values we prize as human beings, freedom should be the most important. If we have freedom, all things are possible. If we do not have freedom, none are. This country was founded on the idea of freedom — that rights inhere in the individual — that, in Jefferson’s words, “that government is best which governs the least.” Capitalism, with all its inequalities, uncertainties and other bumps along the road, is the logical economic system of that belief. And socialism is its antithesis. Any system that has as its foundation the subservience of the individual to the group will eventually elevate the group to the point where the individual no longer matters. The idea that an elite few has both the obligation and the ability to dictate the welfare of all will mature into the idea that those few have the right to control everyone. And that is tyranny. We don’t even have to follow that arrogance to its logical, bloody and inevitable conclusion to be a little frightened. Just consider the economies of states like Illinois and California that are nearing collapse as governments reach and surpass the ability to give away other people’s money. Just consider the cliff on which the federal government teeters with its trillions in debt, borrowing 40 cents of every dollar it spends. That which cannot continue will not continue. If the idea of tyranny doesn’t frighten you, what do you think about anarchy? Or think about the Green New Deal, the American socialists’ current version of utopia for this country. It aims, in a single decade, to eliminate fossil fuels, retrofit every house in America and return agriculture to subsistence levels. The effect on American life would be enormous, the cost incalculable. As far as I can tell, the point of such ecological zealotry is to save the environment by making the country unlivable. Mayor Buttigieg loves the Green New Deal. He says it is "the right beginning" for a broad plan to combat climate change. The beginning? Forgive me for my outmoded thinking, but that’s a debate ender for me.
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Openly Gay Trump Admin Member Compares Buttigieg to Jussie Smollett

Postby smix » Tue Apr 23, 2019 7:26 pm

Openly Gay Trump Admin Member Compares Buttigieg to Jussie Smollett
Townhall

URL: https://townhall.com/tipsheet/cortneyob ... e-n2545107
Category: Politics
Published: April 20, 2019

Description: South Bend, Indiana Mayor and 2020 presidential candidate Pete Buttigieg insists on picking a fight with Vice President Mike Pence, but so far he's been disappointed. Pence has "no problem" with Buttigieg, having worked with him when he was governor of Indiana. He's known him for years. Still, the mayor insists that Pence's belief in traditional marriage and his views on homosexuality are bigoted and backward. U.S. ambassador to Germany Richard Grenell is also gay, yet he took Pence's side on this one. In a recent Fox News interview, he not only defended the Pences' character, but he went so far as to accuse Buttigieg of staging a "hate hoax" in the same vein as "Empire" actor Jussie Smollett.
Amb. @RichardGrenell: “Mike Pence is a friend of mine. Mike and Karen are great people. They’re godly people. They’re followers of Christ. They don’t have hate in their hearts for anyone.” How about you @PeteButtigieg? You have hate in your heart?

fox-buttigieg-pence.jpg

— Arthur Schwartz (@ArthurSchwartz) April 19, 2019

Pence, Grenell shared, has warmly "accepted" him and his partner, and have always extended to them Christian hospitality. Buttigieg, meanwhile, "has been pushing this hate hoax along the lines of Jussie Smollett for a very long time now." Grenell finds it "really ironic" that Buttigieg waited to speak out against Pence until he announced his campaign for president. Media analysts agree that Buttigieg's unnecessary and one-sided bickering with Pence is not a good look.
Pete Buttigieg is a talented politician with a bright future in his party. But his cynical effort to pick a fight with Pence, who has praised him and treated him with respect, is a stain that will last. @RichardGrenell nails it here.
— Brit Hume (@brithume) April 19, 2019

Gay rights groups, however, argue that a sitting ambassador shouldn't be weighing in on 2020 candidates.
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