• Advertisement
To advertise, place classifieds free ads by category in a forum as a new topic, or in the classified display ads section, or start a classifieds free blog.

Trump looking at fast ways to quit global climate deal: source

Trump looking at fast ways to quit global climate deal: source

Postby smix » Sun Nov 13, 2016 7:25 am

Trump looking at fast ways to quit global climate deal: source
Reuters

URL: http://www.reuters.com/article/us-usa-e ... SKBN1370JX
Category: Politics
Published: November 12, 2016

Description: WASHINGTON/MARRAKESH, Morocco (Reuters) - Donald Trump is seeking quick ways of withdrawing from a global agreement to limit climate change, a source on his transition team said, defying widening international backing for the plan to cut greenhouse gas emissions. Since the U.S. President-elect was chosen, governments ranging from China to small island states have reaffirmed support for the 2015 Paris Agreement at 200-nation climate talks running until Nov. 18 in Marrakesh, Morocco. Trump, who has called global warming a hoax and has promised to quit the Paris Agreement, was considering ways to bypass a theoretical four-year procedure for leaving the accord, according to the source, who works on Trump's transition team for international energy and climate policy. "It was reckless for the Paris agreement to enter into force before the election" on Tuesday, the source told Reuters, speaking on condition of anonymity. The Paris Agreement won enough backing for entry into force on Nov. 4. Alternatives were to send a letter withdrawing from a 1992 Convention that is the parent treaty of the Paris Agreement, voiding U.S. involvement in both in a year's time, or to issue a presidential order simply deleting the U.S. signature from the Paris accord, he said. Many nations have expressed hopes the United States will stay. Host Morocco said the agreement that seeks to phase out greenhouse gases in the second half of the century was strong enough to survive a pullout. "If one party decides to withdraw that it doesn't call the agreement into question," Foreign Minister Salaheddine Mezouar told a news conference. The agreement was reached by almost 200 nations in December and, as of Saturday, has been formally ratified by 109 representing 76 percent of greenhouse gas emissions, including the United States with 18 percent. The accord seeks to limit rising temperatures that have been linked to increasing economic damage from decertification, extinctions of animals and plants, heat waves, floods and rising sea levels. U.N. climate chief Patricia Espinosa declined to comment on the Trump source's remarks to Reuters. "The Paris Agreement carries an enormous amount of weight and credibility," she told a news conference. She said the United Nations hoped for a strong and constructive relationship with Trump. The Trump source blamed U.S. President Barack Obama for joining up by an executive order, without getting approval from the Senate. "There wouldn't be this diplomatic fallout on the broader international agenda if Obama hadn't rushed the adoption," he said.



Trump win threatens climate funds for poor, a key to Paris accord
Reuters

URL: http://www.reuters.com/article/us-usa-e ... SKBN1370BD
Category: Politics
Published: November 12, 2016

Description: MARRAKESH, Morocco (Reuters) - President-elect Donald Trump's policies are likely to make it harder for developing nations to obtain the growing finance they need to combat climate change, threatening one pillar of a 2015 international agreement to slow global warming. Many developing nations' promises to act under last year's Paris Agreement set pre-conditions including increasing funds to help them limit greenhouse gas emissions and make their economies more resilient to heat waves, floods, storms and rising seas. Without extra money, they say they won't be able to do so much. Trump, who has called man-made climate change a hoax, wants to cancel the Paris Agreement and halt any U.S. taxpayer funds for U.N. global warming programs. If he follows through, that will threaten a collective pledge by rich nations in Paris to raise climate finance from both public and private sources from a combined $100 billion a year promised for 2020. Since Trump's win, nations from China to Saudi Arabia have reaffirmed their support for the Paris Agreement's goal of eliminating net greenhouse gas emissions sometime from 2050 to 2100. But there is widespread unease about finance at the Nov. 7-18 talks on climate change among almost 200 nations being held in Marrakesh, Morocco. "My only worry is the money," said Tosi Mpanu Mpanu of Democratic Republic of Congo, who heads a group of the 48 least developed nations. "It's worrying when you know that Trump is a climate change skeptic," he told Reuters. "Investments in green growth can be braked ... green finance can be braked," under Trump, French Environment Minister Segolene Royal told Reuters, calling some of Trump's climate policies "catastrophic". Among the first casualties could be the Green Climate Fund (GCF), meant to help developing countries act. Rich nations promised the GCF $10 billion in a first round of funding in 2014, including $3.0 billion from the United States. President Barack Obama's administration has only made $500 million available so far, and Trump may withhold the rest. The collective 2020 goal of $100 billion in climate finance was originally set at a summit in Copenhagen in 2009. Democrat Hillary Clinton, defeated by Trump, announced U.S. support for the plan at the time as U.S Secretary of State. In the run-up to a Paris summit last year, the United Nations sometimes referred to climate finance as a "golden key" to unlock a global deal. The Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development has estimated that climate finance reached $62 billion in 2014 and a report last month, before the U.S. election, said the $100 billion seemed in reach. Many environmental groups say the flows are exaggerated. Moroccan Environment Minister Hakima El Haite said developing nations were most likely to suffer from a lack of funds to help them adapt to climate change, such as building sea walls or developing drought-resistant crops. A shift from fossil fuels was more robust because falling prices of solar or wind power were making renewable energies competitive with coal or oil in many markets. "This is not a business where we need to have funds," she said of a shift to renewables. According to the International Energy Agency, renewables accounted for a record 153 gigawatts of electricity capacity added worldwide in 2015, more than half of the world total. Cumulative installed renewable power capacity overtook coal for the first time last year, it said.



U.S. to push ahead on climate pact before Trump takes over: Kerry
Reuters

URL: http://www.reuters.com/article/us-usa-e ... SKBN138024
Category: Politics
Published: November 13, 2016

Description: WELLINGTON (Reuters) - U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry said on Sunday the Obama administration would do everything it could to implement a global agreement to combat climate change before President-elect Donald Trump takes office. Kerry made the comments during a visit to New Zealand just before setting off to Marrakesh, Morocco to take part in climate talks between 200 nations. Donald Trump, who calls global warming a hoax and has promised to quit the Paris Agreement, was considering ways to bypass a theoretical four-year procedure for leaving the accord, according to a source on Trump's transition team. Kerry declined to speculate on what Trump might do about the Paris Agreement and noted that there was sometimes a difference between campaigning and governing.

kerry-mcmurdo.jpg

But the top American diplomat was clear he thought further action to prevent climate change should be a priority. "The evidence is mounting in ways that people in public life should not dare to avoid accepting as a mandate for action," Kerry told journalists at a press conference in Wellington with New Zealand Prime Minister John Key. "Until January 20 when this administration is over, we intend to do everything possible to meet our responsibility to future generations to be able to address this threat to life itself on the planet." Kerry's visit to Wellington followed a two-day trip to Antarctica where he flew in a helicopter over the West Antarctic Ice Sheet, which would add to rising sea levels if it melts, and spoke to scientists researching how fast climate change is likely to occur. The U.S. accounts for just under 20 percent of global greenhouse gas emissions so is considered a key player in the Paris Agreement, which has been ratified by 109 countries so far. The accord seeks to limit rising temperatures that have been linked to increasing economic damage from desertification, extinctions of animals and plants, heat waves, floods and rising sea levels.
User avatar
smix
 
Posts: 1803104
Images: 1
Joined: Sat Aug 10, 2013 8:05 am
Blog: View Blog (0)

Re: U.S. to push ahead on climate pact before Trump takes over: Kerry

Postby samurai » Sun Nov 13, 2016 6:23 pm



Kerry tinkers with the weather and ...

kerry-stops-global-warming.jpg


User avatar
samurai
 
Posts: 544
Images: 2
Joined: Thu Jul 11, 2013 4:55 pm
Blog: View Blog (0)

Obama undermines Trump with ambitious new climate change plan

Postby smix » Fri Nov 18, 2016 2:29 am

Obama undermines Trump with ambitious new climate change plan
Washington Times

URL: http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/201 ... ous-new-c/
Category: Politics
Published: November 17, 2016

Description: President-elect Donald Trump says he’ll abandon his predecessor’s global climate change deal, but that didn’t stop the Obama administration this week from rolling out a new, even more ambitious plan to cut U.S. emissions by 80 percent by 2050, undermining the incoming president on the world stage two months before his inauguration. The latest proposal, which critics on Capitol Hill say is dead on arrival as soon as Mr. Trump enters the White House on Jan. 20, is being sold to the rest of the world as a long-term road map to U.S. greenhouse gas reductions. It comes as Mr. Trump is also under growing pressure from foreign governments and leading U.S. companies not to walk away from President Obama’s climate change vision. Seeking to reassure the rest of the world, Secretary of State John F. Kerry told a United Nations climate conference in Morocco that U.S. progress against global warming essentially is permanent, all but ignoring the fact that Mr. Trump has made it crystal-clear he plans to scrap the administration’s climate agenda immediately. As he touted the latest proposal to slash emissions even further, he also suggested to other world leaders that if the U.S. does reverse course and abdicate its leadership on climate change, Mr. Trump alone will be to blame. “This really is a turning point. It is a cause for optimism, notwithstanding what you see in different countries with respect to politics and change,” Mr. Kerry said in a speech late Wednesday. “In no uncertain terms, the question now is not whether we will transition … to a clean energy economy. That we’ve already begun to do. The question now is whether or not we are going to have the will to get this job done. “That’s the question now — whether we will make the transition in time to be able to do what we have to do to prevent catastrophic damage,” Mr. Kerry concluded. The latest proposal represents the administration’s final attempt to secure President Obama’s legacy on climate change — a legacy Mr. Trump has vowed to undo, first by pulling the U.S. out of an agreement it signed in Paris last year vowing to cut emissions by at least 26 percent by 2025. The cuts would be achieved through Environmental Protection Agency restrictions on emissions from coal-fired power plants, more renewable energy, energy-efficiency measures and other steps, most of which are already underway. The deal also requires China to cap its emissions by 2030 and then begin reducing them. The new proposal unveiled in Morocco keeps all of those U.S. targets in place while setting another, even more ambitious long-term goal of reducing emissions by at least 80 percent over the next 35 years, a threshold that is achievable only through an accelerated move away from fossil fuels and toward renewable power. Governments at the U.N. conference also passed a declaration calling their global warming progress “irreversible,” and reiterated a vow from wealthy nations to commit at least $100 billion to help poorer countries reduce their own emissions. But critics say Mr. Kerry is wasting his time and is engaged in naked political posturing, and that any decisions reached at the meeting will be worthless within two months. “Secretary Kerry’s pledge at the United Nation’s climate conference in Morocco is a last-ditch effort to save the president’s crumbling climate legacy. His pledge to cut emissions by 80 percent likely will be no more relevant to the incoming Trump administration than the president’s signature on the Paris Agreement,” said Sen. James M. Inhofe, Oklahoma Republican and chairman of the Senate Committee on Environment and Public Works. Indeed, Mr. Trump said repeatedly on the campaign trail that he intends to pull the U.S. out of the Paris climate agreement, a deal he cast as a job-killing, big-government approach to energy and the environment. The Trump transition team did not respond to a request for comment. Back at home, Mr. Trump is facing new pressure to stick with Mr. Obama’s course on climate change. Hundreds of leading businesses, including Starbucks, IKEA, Hewlett-Packard, Kellogg, Staples and others on Thursday sent an open letter to Mr. Trump, calling on the billionaire for more government spending on low-carbon energy and asking that he continue to pursue the emissions targets set by the Obama administration. “Failure to build a low-carbon economy puts American prosperity at risk. But the right action now will create jobs and boost US competitiveness,” the companies said in the letter. “We pledge to do our part, in our own operations and beyond, to realize the Paris Agreement’s commitment of a global economy that limits global temperature rise to well below 2 degrees Celsius.” But public pressure essentially is the only leverage available against the incoming Trump administration. The Paris deal, and the long-term road map laid out this week, are not binding in any way because the agreement was never even submitted to the Senate, much less ratified — a necessary step to make the deal a legally binding treaty. The U.S. environmental policies put in place to meet emissions targets can be reversed quickly by the next president, though some of the specific moves — such as states being forced through federal regulation to shutter coal-fired power plants — may be difficult to undo. Specialists say Mr. Trump may take an extra step of asking the GOP-led Congress to formally reject the international deals, though such a step is by no means legally necessary. “There’s talk about, do you send it to the Senate to be rejected? I think that’s a possibility, but it’s a nonbinding agreement,” said Chris Warren, vice president of communications at the conservative Institute for Energy Research. “To get the process started, all President-elect Trump has to do is come and say we’re not going to honor these empty commitments made by the Obama administration.”
User avatar
smix
 
Posts: 1803104
Images: 1
Joined: Sat Aug 10, 2013 8:05 am
Blog: View Blog (0)


  • Similar Topics
    Replies
    Views
    Last post

Return to Green Technology


Mobile Device
  • 1
  • FREE CLASSIFIED ADS
    Free Classified Ads
    There are 3 ways to advertise - your choice: you can place free ads in a forum topic, in the classified display ads section, or you may start your own free blog. Please select the appropriate category and forum for the ad content before you post. Do not spam.
    Caveat emptor - let the buyer beware. Deal at your own risk and peril.
  • Advertisement